Peter Marcus

Dark Square

$14.95

A riveting collection of poems ranging from the very personal and sexual to the broader lyric poem.

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Description

A riveting collection of poems ranging from the very personal and sexual to the broader lyric poem. Marcus demonstrates the versatility that has put some of these poems in such diverse publications as Poetry, Alimentum, Harvard Review, and Ploughshares.

 

Peter Marcus’s  poems have appeared in AGNI, Antioch Review, Boulevard, Crab Orchard Review, The New England Review, The Notre Dame Review, Poetry, Ploughshares, Quarterly West, RATTLE, Shenandoah, The Southern Review, Spillway, Witness and others. His poems have also appeared in two human rights anthologies: “Before We Have Nowhere To Stand‏: Poems on Israel and Palestine, “ and “ I Go To Ruined Places: Contemporary Poems in Defense of Global Human Rights,” both published by Lost Horse Press. He has upcoming poems in: Crab Orchard Review, Nimrod, RATTLE, UPSTREET and others. He has been a recipient of a state of Connecticut Arts Grant and a residency fellowship at Vermont Studio Center. He is the academic program coordinator and lecturer at Elms College’s Accelerated Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology Program at Mount Wachusetts Community College, in Gardner, MA. (This updated bio borrowed from: http://www.marblehouseproject.org/new-blog/2016/12/14/peter-marcus)

Additional information

Weight 5.6 oz
Dimensions 5.8 × 0.2 × 8.8 in
Format

Paperback

Author

Peter Marcus

ISBN

978-1-929355-82-2

Amazon

http://a.co/1NOFks4

Original Language

English

Publish Date

3/26/2012

Page/Word Count

112 pages

Praise

a minor masterpiece. All in all a very good read. I recommend this book not only to those interested in a therapist's viewpoint of his work but also to anyone fascinated by places of travel. Also, Chilling, in my opinion, Riveting ByJoseon October 11, sexy and riveting. This is a book of strange Beauty and hard-hitting truths which is a must read for anyone interested in contemporary American poetry., the love poems are quite unique – unsentimental, Unsentimental

Imprint

PBS

2 reviews for Dark Square

  1. Lauren Hilger, Poet, Poetry printed in Alaska Quarterly Review, CutBank, Sonora Review, and elsewhere. She is a finalist for the Iowa Review Poetry Contest and a 2012 MacDowell Fellow in Poetry.

    Dark Square, Peter Marcus’s first collection, surveys the emotional terrain of a doctor. Acting as a present-day Virgil, Marcus has the reader witness therapy sessions, wings of hospitals, rehabilitation centers; he introduces the afflicted by name; and, like Virgil, he brings us back out. The suffering of his many patients, what’s hidden and subsequently revealed, move these powerful narratives.

    Freud is present throughout both thematically—the book’s section titles suggest his major works—and in epigraph. Even as the narrator travels, as he does within “Borders and Crossing,” the voyeuristic reader follows, sees, and learns intimately of the people and patients encountered. As the emotional register reaches a peak, Marcus’s conversational tone keeps these poems from launching into forced empathy. Marcus’s lines often read unadorned as if they are spoken directly:

    She walks into my office, crying.

    This moment, like others throughout Dark Square, holds the reader under the present tense of distress. Reading these poems one is in the clutch of some painful admission, then abruptly distanced from it. The speaker, when he seems to come too close, names “the billable clock,” his diploma, his “language tool,” in an attempt to distinguish himself from torment. There is safety in these marks of difference, or at least, the speaker would like for these strict delineations to exist.

    The speaker asserts he can “uncover all these girls alive beneath the rubble,” yet he wavers and asks of the reader, “How should a therapist respond”? Accountability is placed on the reader, who, entering the voice, is either “uncovering” or failing to do so. Marcus tells us, “My patient remained inconsolable through the hour.” The possessive determiner “my,” often used, brings one to question what is it that one possesses of another person?

    Marcus writes into this question from the perspective of relationships. The poem “The Affair” begins, “I want what I want when I want it. This is not a song.” Yet the Irving Berlin lyric speaks to a libido that acts as irrational pull, Freud’s id. In this light, lovers provide consolation and reward though not without risk. Beware of “Harpies / dressed in evening wear, vicious teeth.”

    Vicious or otherwise, the poems of the section “Eros Stricken” invoke the female in the fashion of a blason: she is skin, eyes, mouth, all invitation. Yet Marcus writes beyond the body and into the complexity of the speaker’s relationships—within these poems sex is not invariably an exercise in dominance; these connections are revered and central.

    Often in neat tercets or couplets, charged with “luscious nudes,” Marcus acknowledges the intensity and weight of desire. These poems are not out to seduce the reader though, unless one responds to lines such as: “I know her pastor couldn’t comfort her like this” (“Petite Mort”).

    Such is the challenge of writing love poems that remain sexy while being read in the cold, acerbic light of, say, the subway. The stunning poem “The Embrace,” however, caught this reader off guard. Here, the scene opens with a man writhing, bucking, and spewing expletives at orderlies. Once the patient is carried away, perhaps his plan (“he is asking for this”), Marcus writes, “I admire the empty straitjacket / flaccid on the gurney.” Dark Square forces us to ask, how does one receive comfort, compassion, an embrace, unless one directly asks for it? The poem ends with an imperative.

    Strap me down
    under buckle & belt.

    Hold me.

  2. Jose, Amazon reader

    A Chilling book of Poems ranging from poet Peter Marcus’ work in mental health facilities to love poems to poems about his wide-ranging travels both within and outside the U.S. I shivered especially upon finishing the first section of the book “Dreaming and Waking.” The final poem in that section – “Dark Remedies” – is, in my opinion, a minor masterpiece. All in all a very good read. I recommend this book not only to those interested in a therapist’s viewpoint of his work but also to anyone fascinated by places of travel. Also, the love poems are quite unique – unsentimental, sexy and riveting. This is a book of strange Beauty and hard-hitting truths which is a must read for anyone interested in contemporary American poetry.

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