Artrage is Everett Aison's first novel. His feature film screenplays include "Ted Sears," "Growing Up In America," and "Work In Progress." He has written and directed three award-winning theatrical shorts: “Post No Bills!" "So Much In Common," and "Choices."



Artrage is Everett Aison's first novel. His feature film screenplays include "Ted Sears," "Growing Up In America," and "Work In Progress." He has written and directed three award-winning theatrical shorts: “Post No Bills!" "So Much In Common," and "Choices."Everett co-founded with Silas Rhodes the School of Visual Arts Film School. He has designed and illustrated the children's books Arthur and The American Movie, published by Atheneum, was art director of Grossman Publishers, and designed the logos, posters, and opening titles for many films, including Akira Kurosawa's Yojimbo and Roman Polanski's Knife In the Water.


Everett’s children’s book, Arthur, was just re-released by New York Review of Books Special Press. It has received wonderful responses.


Everett aison
 

Artrage has received strong and intelligent reviews. Please click here to read some of them.

”I've just come back from a quick roundtrip to Boston, which gave me the leisure to really get into Artrage. I really enjoyed it. It was like a long letter from the author with his preoccupations and ideas and creativity rolled together. I laughed out loud at some parts and was moved by others, especially the relation between Mace and Nick. It's really quite a lot of fun. I do think that in many places it reads more like a screenplay rather than a novel: characters get sketched in too briefly ("a spirited Korean teenager") as if they are waiting for some actor to embody them. And I must say that I don't really get the sex side and found it somewhat distracting from the satire of art
world absurdities. Mace is certainly not without faults, which is fine, but his erotic fantasies and reminiscences to me take a little of the sting out of his actions.” - Leo Braudy


“I thoroughly enjoyed Everett Aison’s novel about a regular guy who commits an acte gratuite, the desecration of an art world treasure, and its wildly snowballing consequences.  Mace is a funny, slightly sex-obsessed, and not always sympathetic protagonist, for this story of a provocation is itself a provocation. Humane at its core, though, this novel takes a bead on the obscene mix of art, money and the media with the best possible humor.” - Molly Haskell




 

“The fictional art world that Artrage conjures up has a discomfiting edge of reality. The novel, to use a much-overused phrase, is a page-turner.” - Irving Sandler